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Special cultural tour

Coastal and Highlands Tribes Escorted Tour. 11 nights. 7- 18 September 2017. Culminates at the Goroka Festival. $3195. click here

PNG Festival packages

PNG liveaboards

9-night Spirit of Niugini cruise: Milne Bay, and southern islands, 18th to 27th September 2017 from $2640 click here

Meet us

7 to 10 January 2017: Paris Dive Show 

4 and 5 March 2017: Madrid Dive Travel Show

24 - 26 March 2017: Beneath the Sea, New Jersey

6 - 7 May 2017: Long Beach Scuba Show, California

November 2017 : DEMA Orlando (trade only)


TUFI WRECK DIVING



Tufi Wharf - 1943

Tufi Wharf - Today

B17 Black Jack Tufi Dive Resort Papua New Guinea
B17 Black Jack turret, Tufi Dive Resort Papua New Guinea

The Tufi wharf was originally occupied by the Japanese but was subsequently the site of a USN Advance PT Boat base from December 1942 with PT Boats operating along the coast from Buna to Mambare.

Off the wharf there is a large amount of wreckage and debris, including PT Boats, a large concrete boat, empty 200 litre drums and anti-tank barriers. A very interesting dive just a short swim from the wharf, you can dive in and around the remains of 2 PT boats (PT67 and PT119), burned and sunk during an air raid in March 1943. There are still 2 live torpedoes down there completely intact. A couple of anti-aircraft machine guns and lots of ammo are scattered around and about.

One of the highlights of this dive is a perfectly good ol' Landrover... The secret of how it got to be 'parked' there so neatly will be revealed after you completed this dive!

This is a decompression dive with max depth 45m. Deco stops are compulsory and surface interval of 4 hours is mandatory before the second dive.

B-17F "Black Jack"

The WWII US Bomber, nicknamed “Black Jack”, was built in Seattle on July 23, 1943 at a cost of US$314,109. The right-hand side of the nose had two playing cards painted on it: ‘Jack and Ace making 21 in poker’.

Discovered on December 27, 1986, Black Jack’s nose was torn and crumpled when it impacted the bottom. The rest of the bomber is in excellent condition. The waist guns and radio transmitters were jettisoned prior to the crash, but all other weapons and gear are present.

When descending down a submerged mooring buoy, the diver is immediately greeted by a large school of very big batfish. Because this wreck is seldom dived, they are not afraid of divers and come within touching distance. Below them are large schools of pelagic and various varieties of sharks.

The Bomber is in 50m depth (164ft) on a white sandy bottom. Bottom time allowed is only 10 minutes. The rest of the 100 minutes total bottom time of this dive is taken up with the ascent and stringent safety stops along the way.

A special dive profile with compulsory safety stops is required, followed by a minimum surface interval of 4 hrs. Because of its location and long distance from base, there is an extra cost involved in diving this wreck.

We will only allow very experienced divers with a minimum of 50 logged deep dives and a minimum of advanced diver qualification.

The Wreck Of The 'S Jacob'

The S Jacob was a Dutch Merchant Navy ship, which was sunk during a Japanese air raid in WWII. It lies upright on a flat sandy bottom in 60 m of water and is undoubtedly one of the prettiest wrecks accessible by only very experienced deep divers.

When descending down a submerged mooring buoy, the diver is immediately greeted by a large school of very big Batfish. Because this wreck is seldom dived, they are unafraid of divers and come within touching distance. Below them are large schools of Pelagic and various varieties of sharks. The deck is in 50-m depth and covered in black coral trees. It is like swimming through a winter wonderland of trees covered in white frost. Penetration is possible, but requires the utmost care.

Bottom time allowed is only 10 mins. The rest of the 100 mins total bottom time of this dive is taken up with the ascent and stringent safety stops along the way. A special dive profile with compulsory safety stops is required, followed by a minimum surface interval of 4 hrs. Because of its location and long distance from base, there is an extra cost involved in diving this wreck.

We will only allow very experienced divers with a minimum of 50 logged deep dives and a minimum of advanced diver qualification. Diving this wreck is weather depended. Often strong currents and poor visibility makes it impossible to do this dive.

P-38F

Assigned into 35th FG September 17, 1942. The 17th Provisional Pursuit Squadron was re-formed (the original 17PS served in the Philippines) by General Kenney at Amberley in November 1942.

On November 4th 1942, Richard Chellp took off, suffered engine failure, failed to drop his tanks and ditched. He was picked up by a launch. The location of the field/ditching was not given. Now it can not be a coincidence that a P-38F with the serial number 2-12649 has been found intact, ditched and that 2-12649's history card says that it was written off on November 4, 1942. 

It is located on a reef slope between 12 and 17 meters deep. The props were feathered and pilot made a perfect water landing without damaging the aircraft. It is a beautiful site as the wreck has heavy coral and colourful sponge growth.

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